Winter foraging challenge

I’d like to offer you all a little winter-warming challenge. Come forage with me, however near or far away you are! Let’s track down some nutrient loaded plants, cook up a few treats and stir some strange brews to ease us all through the darkest part of the year.

I’ll add ideas here each Tuesday, of plants which can be found fairly easily and suggestions of what to do with them. If you find them, it would be great if you could send me a photo so that I can upload them and we can all see what we’re finding and creating. Fancy joining the challenge? Here we go for this week with:

Winter warmer #1: Lime tree buds They grow out of the trunks of these fabulous city trees. Several species of Lime (Tilia spp.) do really well in towns and cities so they are widely planted. Over 17,000 grace the streets of Amsterdam alone so I’m sure that there’s one not too far from you. When in leaf, you will know them from their heart shaped pale green leaves but at the moment, most of their leaves have fallen or are ready to fall so we don’t forage them.

Where to find them
The buds however, are available year-round, if you know where to look. They grow out of the Lime tree trunk, from burrs or simply from low branches and twigs and they contain the leaves which will emerge next spring. So they are tiny, concentrated nutrient bombs and I like to forage a few when I am out walking in autumn and winter. Lime has a habit of being able to grow leaves all down its trunk, so occasionally you will find one with the leaf buds within easy reach.

Lime leaf buds

How to forage them
Select buds above waist height from large Lime trees. Snap one off, without causing further damage to the tree, clean it off and have a nibble. They need to be chewed for a while, in order to release the constituents. If you like them, take a few home in a paper bag.

How to use them
Lime buds make a great snack to nibble on and they also taste lovely as a tea. They contain lots of mucilage which releases from the cells when chewed or soaked for a while. That’s very soothing for the respiratory system. Lime leaves have been found by many to be helpful for coughs, colds, fevers, headaches, inflammation, as a diuretic, general tonic, to calm the gut and to soothe nerves. These little winter gems are also packed with a gentle nervine. In general, Tilia is thought of as soothing, relaxing and promoting feelings of happiness.

Of course, be careful and follow the foraging rules. Occasional people have an allergy to any sort of plant. Lime belongs to the Malvaceae family, which contains lots of incredible plants and many are considered safe to eat but everyone is different. So as ever, take care and enjoy your foraging.

Find any?
Did you manage this week’s challenge? Did you cook up anything with them? What did you think of the experience? I am very intrigued to know.

It would be lovely if you would send me a photo and I’ll add it to next Tuesday’s post. Please send your photos to urban.herbology.lynn@gmail.com

Goodbye until next time!

3 thoughts on “Winter foraging challenge

  1. Hi Lynn Hope everyone is doing ok. I haven’t come across any lime tree buds yet but I did find some really good rose hips this week. Perhaps you could demonstrate a rose hip syrup for one of your zoom gatherings. I think I have a recipe for that. I’ll have a go this weekend and let you know how it went next week Xx

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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