Category Archives: Urban Herb Walks

#8 Daisy

It’s week 8 of the Urban Herbology Winter Foraging Challenge! This week I have been foraging Jelly ear fungi from local Elder trees and making orange-jelly-choc’s from them. Delicious! My daughter will show us how to make them on this Friday evening’s zoom, for my course students. Details of the courses are here. Start and stop whenever you like!

Photo credit: Weed fun

This week’s features winter foraging herb is the humble yet beautiful Daisy (Bellis perennis). You can easily tell from the classic ray and disk flowerhead arrangement, that this is a member of the huge Asteraceae family.

Now, that plant family is one of the most common sources of plant allergen in humans, so go careful with it. It tends to cause contact dermatitis in those who are sensitive and the most notable allergens in the Asteraceae family are a group of chemicals called sesquiterpene lactones. Those secondary plant metabolites are present in the leaf, stem, flower and possibly also in the pollen. Individuals who know they are sensitive to those chemicals, or the Asteraceae family, should steer clear of handling and eating Daisy. People diagnosed with the issue some years ago, may know the Asteraceae family as the Compositae family.

Daisy plant – Perennial, humble, powerful and robust

Bellis perennis is often known as common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy. The Dutch name is Madeliefje. It is a small perennial herb that is native to almost the whole of Europe. It has a long history of use in folk medicine in the treatment of various diseases, such as rheumatism and as an expectorant. There is evidence that during the ancient Roman times, army field surgeons used to gather up daisies, from along the roadsides, extract the plant juice, and use it to soak bandages which could be used to dress battle wounds. There are many other references to Daisy in old herbal texts.

Pushing up daisies – January cemetery walk, Amsterdam

In homeopathy, Bellis perennis remedy is used for deep wound healing, including post surgical healing. If you would like to make a flower essence, you will certainly catch people’s attention as the flowers of Daisy look so pretty, floating atop a bowl of spring water.

All of the daisies in my muddy, wintery photos today, lack any tinge of pink on the under sides of the petals but that is a common feature for foragers to look out for, when identifying the plant. One old story explains how that pink tinge came about:

“Rose, the queen of the flowers, had a party and all the flowers were invited. One little flower was left out, however – it was shy of its modest appearance and was happy to whisper its congratulations from afar. But the wind carried the flower’s words to the queen, who assured her that there was no need to be ashamed: Its dress was spotlessly white and it had a heart of gold. This made the little flower blush, and ever since then the tips of its ray-florets have been pink.”
Extract from Aegean Edibles website – it’s an interesting website to investigate.

Daisy manages very well under frequent pressure. These are along a graveyard path.

Daisy grows only to a small height of 2 – 3 centimetres, when in bloom and is very tolerant of trampling footsteps, so we often find it growing in lawns, paths and well trodden edges. At this time of year, it stands out to me because it is surviving in quite bare ground and also in ground where only Plantain and Ribwort (Plantago spp.) are usually to flourish. Interestingly, those plants also share some of the therapeutic properties of Daisy. At this time of year though, if we get a cold winter, the plantains dive undergound.

Someone got there first..

Crush a smooth fleshy leaf of daisy, or its flowers or even the underground roots and a pleasant green aroma is released as the sap inside is freed up. Bellis perennis has been found to contain many active constituents, including at least ten different saponins. The active constituents in this plant grace it with many healing properties. Daisy is known to be anti-inflammatory, astringent, digestive, antispasmodic, healing, laxative, purgative, antitussive, demulcent, and expectorant. I consider it a humble, ever giving, herbal medicine chest. There is increasing anti-cancer evidence, for Daisy but this plant shouldn’t be used as an anti-cancer treatment. Chewing leaves for mouth ulcers or making a salve from the flowers and leaves, is more the level of self-treatment that I think about, with daisy.

Perky Daisy foliage – January 2021

To eat daisy – eat only a little. This is a potent medicinal herb. You will need to forage in a clean patch of land. And you need to be non-allergic to it (see above note about the Asteraceae family). All this mention of allergies, makes it seem that many foragers will be allergic to Asteraceae plants. The reality is less dramatic than it may sound but we should be aware that it could happen.

There is not much chance of foraging for daisy above dog-pee height, as it grows on the ground but it can be grown in pots and it will grow as easily in clean soil as in trampled doggy spots. It does best in areas where the surrounding plants are not so tall and heavy that they completely shade the daisy out. So low cut grass – lawns – are perfect territory for this humble, edible and medicinal weed.

The flowers can be added to soups. The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. Make sure they are clean, whatever you do with them. I find that the leaves taste pretty good as a salad ingredient, surprisingly good actually. Try the flowers or leaves as a tea. Dry them for later use.

If you don’t fancy your chances with eating daisy, you may like to try making a poultice of Daisy leaves, to use as an astringent, anti-inflammatory wound healer. Daisy is also renowned as an effective agent to calm bruises and to prevent them from forming. You could make an oil infusion and then thicken up the oil with some form of natural wax (beeswax, soya wax etc). Or infuse straight into a butter (literally butter or something more fancy such as shea butter).

Do let me know how you get on with your winter foraging. It is great to feel others are doing similar things!

#7 Yellow deadnettle

So we’re now between Christmas and New Year and on week 7 of the Urban Herbology Winter Foraging Challenge! Are you managing to find a little something for the plate each week? I hope so. This week’s urban edible is a really easy to identify member of the Lamiaceae family – Yellow deadnettle or Yellow archangel (Lamium galeobdolon). I would love to know if you find it and make something with it.

Yellow deadnettle

This plant is native to the Netherlands, UK and a great many countries. In Amsterdam, it is found all over town, spreading ground cover in council plantings, parks, woodland, gardens and in random in between places. Yellow deadnettle is easy to identify. It can grow in very shady environments, but also thrives in full sun. Notice the silver white pattern on the upper leaf surface. That pattern does vary between species varieties but the common characterisic is the silver/white.

The stem and leaf arrangement is characteristic of the Lamiaceae family – square stems and leaves in opposite, alternating pairs. Crush a leaf and a pleasant green aroma is released. It has fine (but not stinging) hairs on the leaves and stems so feels a little bit rough, to touch. Later in spring / summer, knee high flower spies develop, displaying whorls of yellow classic mint family shaped flowers. But we are now focusing on plants for winter foraging, so you the plant will need to be identified without it’s blooms.

To eat, Yellow deadnettle is easy. The best parts are the tender young shoots and leaves but winter foragers can’t be quite so fussy and can do really well with sautéed leaves, from the freshest looking specimens. Harvest sparingly from plentiful patches of the plant, in the cleanest places. Wash well, chop and cook. I find they are also an easy addition to stir fries, risotto and pot type dishes as well as smoothies. The leaves dry well and make a pleasant herb tea. All in all, I think that Yellow deadnettle is a real Urban foraging winner and I hope you like it too!

#6 Chickweed

It’s now mid winter in the northern hemisphere and here in east Amsterdam I have been busy with 6 of the Urban Herbology Winter Foraging Challenge. Several people have been reaching out and asking for more suggestions, of what to forage at this time so I am making a video and will post it later this week. Let’s see if anyone can find this little beauty, this week.. Chickweed (Stellaria media):

This is one of my favourite winter foraging plants. It has tiny, fresh green heart-shaped leaves, tiny white star-shaped flowers, a line of single fine hairs down the stem midrib of the plant. Those can be seen only by sharp eyes or through a hand lens so Chickweed identification provides urban foragers a great chance to get their hand lens out and look scientific. Chickweed grows close to the ground, often in convenient clumps from which we can tear off a small handful, without making a visible impact. One key feature of Chickweed midwinter, is that it looks so fresh and verdant. Not much else here looks so bright and pumped full of chlorophyll at the moment. It looks (and often is) far fresher and more full of nutrients than lettuce in the shops and this is my winter salad of preference.

When you tear open the leaves, it smells fresh and does not ooze a white latex sap. If you should find a little plant, looking quite like Chickweed and yet it does ooze white sap, then you have probably stumbled upon Petty spurge (Euphorbia peplus). Please don’t eat it at all and be sure to wash the sap from your skin as it is a classic garners skin irritant.

The photos this week are of a lovely clump of Chickweed which grows in one of my balcony plant pots – so nicely away from dogs, walkers and road spray. I didn’t plant it, it simply found the place and grows really well there. We get a few city birds which settle on the balcony railing to eat found seeds and bugs so perhaps one of them dropped the seed a while back. In any case, I welcome Chickweed and add a spring or two to my food, a few days a week. And in case you are wondering, yes Chickweed is a favourite of birds. They are sometimes found having a nibble. Always wash your foraged finds well, harvest ethically and very lightly and enjoy the bounties that urban nature provides!

#5 Stinging nettle

It’s still looking tasty! Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a wonderfully nutritious herb and is easy to incorporate into the diet.

It is also easy to find and identify. Pick the freshest, youngest looking tips at this time of the year. This body building, protien rich herb doesn’t worry about lock downs. It grows happily in all sorts of conditions and is one of my favourites. Stinging nettle is my fifth Winter Foraging Challenge herb.

#4 Crane’s-bill geranium

It’s getting chilly and dark here in Amsterdam and already we are on week 4 of my Winter Foraging Challenge. Thanks to Louise for the comment and photos about Rosemary last week 🙂 Let’s see if anyone can find this little beauty, this week.. Crane’s-bill geranium:

There’s a lot of variety within this lovely, fragrant group of plants and many are planted deliberately in towns and cities. Examples being Geranium lucidim, Geranium rotundifolium and Geranium pyrenaicum. The pretty flowers are seldom seen at this time of the year but they keep their foliage through winter (although it is less appealing than in spring / summer) and a leaf or two make a great addition to winter meals.

Look out for large clumps of palmately-lobed leaves, atop long almost woody leaf stalks. The leaves are fragrant when rubbed or bruised.

It is the roots which are traditionally used in herbal medicine but I tend to only harvest the leaves. Some of the constituents found in Crane’s-bill roots are: tannins, gallic acid, starch, pectin, and resin. If you are interested to learn more, here is a useful link.

I look forward to finding out who can locate this little winter wonder herb and if anyone is brave enough to have a nibble…

#3 Rosemary

This week’s winter warming herb is a strongly scented evergreen shrub which many people grow in urban gardens. There are a few Rosemary shrubs growing along my street and I am not alone in enjoying a small amount every week or so, in my meals.

My Rosemary needed a drastic haircut this spring due to a Rosemary beetle infestation

If you are able to find some Rosemary, growing near you, I’d love to see a photo and learn what you like to do with it.

Rosemary is in the aromatic Lamiaceae family. It is known for its ability to stimulate the mind and digestive system.

#2 Common Mallow

So we are into week 2 of my Winter Foraging Challenge. Thanks to those who tried to find the nourishing leaf buds from Tilia trees last week. Some of you sent me photos of your foraged finds. No one sent me a Lime bud photo but in hunting for them, Stinging nettles, Elder and Dandelions were found so that’s very positive! I have included Agnesa’s Elder bud photo as these are really common at the moment, they do resemble Lime buds in some ways (colour, size, position on bark and timing) but they are not edible and are useful to learn about. Elder leaves can be very helpful additions to ointments and oils so worth keeping an eye on these and returning in the spring.

Elder leaf buds emerging from the Elder bark (Photo credit: Agnesa)

This week’s plant is the Common mallow (Malva sylvestris). I’ve found quite a lot of healthy looking plants around town lately so I hope you get lucky with them too. Here is a single leaf. Notice that pinky-purple colouration at the centre of the leaf? That’s really characteristic and helps with ID. Breaking the leaf or stem also gives another ID clue – transparent mucilage! It oozes from the broken plant cells.

Malva sylvestris – Amsterdam, late November

I harvest just a couple of leaves (along with the long leaf stalks) from large clumps of this herbaceous plant, wash well, chop finely and add to my smoothies. They contain plenty of mucilage and although they look world’s apart, Common mallow actually belongs to the same plant family as last week’s Lime tree (Tilia spp.).

Patch of Malva sylvestris, growing with Yarrow

If you find any, I’d love to see a photo or two!

At this time of year, flowers on Malva are few and far between but you may find one and if so, it will look something like this one. Does it remind you of hibiscus? That’s because the plants are closely related. Hollyhocks too. I am a big fan of this plant family and will be foraging it occasionally, throughout the winter.

Malva sylvestris (Photo credit: http://kocaelibitkileri.com/malva-sylvestris/)



Winter foraging challenge

I’d like to offer you all a little winter-warming challenge. Come forage with me, however near or far away you are! Let’s track down some nutrient loaded plants, cook up a few treats and stir some strange brews to ease us all through the darkest part of the year.

I’ll add ideas here each Tuesday, of plants which can be found fairly easily and suggestions of what to do with them. If you find them, it would be great if you could send me a photo so that I can upload them and we can all see what we’re finding and creating. Fancy joining the challenge? Here we go for this week with:

Winter warmer #1: Lime tree buds They grow out of the trunks of these fabulous city trees. Several species of Lime (Tilia spp.) do really well in towns and cities so they are widely planted. Over 17,000 grace the streets of Amsterdam alone so I’m sure that there’s one not too far from you. When in leaf, you will know them from their heart shaped pale green leaves but at the moment, most of their leaves have fallen or are ready to fall so we don’t forage them.

Where to find them
The buds however, are available year-round, if you know where to look. They grow out of the Lime tree trunk, from burrs or simply from low branches and twigs and they contain the leaves which will emerge next spring. So they are tiny, concentrated nutrient bombs and I like to forage a few when I am out walking in autumn and winter. Lime has a habit of being able to grow leaves all down its trunk, so occasionally you will find one with the leaf buds within easy reach.

Lime leaf buds

How to forage them
Select buds above waist height from large Lime trees. Snap one off, without causing further damage to the tree, clean it off and have a nibble. They need to be chewed for a while, in order to release the constituents. If you like them, take a few home in a paper bag.

How to use them
Lime buds make a great snack to nibble on and they also taste lovely as a tea. They contain lots of mucilage which releases from the cells when chewed or soaked for a while. That’s very soothing for the respiratory system. Lime leaves have been found by many to be helpful for coughs, colds, fevers, headaches, inflammation, as a diuretic, general tonic, to calm the gut and to soothe nerves. These little winter gems are also packed with a gentle nervine. In general, Tilia is thought of as soothing, relaxing and promoting feelings of happiness.

Of course, be careful and follow the foraging rules. Occasional people have an allergy to any sort of plant. Lime belongs to the Malvaceae family, which contains lots of incredible plants and many are considered safe to eat but everyone is different. So as ever, take care and enjoy your foraging.

Find any?
Did you manage this week’s challenge? Did you cook up anything with them? What did you think of the experience? I am very intrigued to know.

It would be lovely if you would send me a photo and I’ll add it to next Tuesday’s post. Please send your photos to urban.herbology.lynn@gmail.com

Goodbye until next time!

Images of autumn

I’ve been busy with all sorts since my last post. There’s a little competition at the end of this one for those able to get to Amsterdam who fancy trying for a free Herbology Walk in Amsterdam oost. Work (school) has been lively. We’re fully open and yet the rest of the world seems to be closing up. Interesting times for all!

Am loving helping new Urban Herbology students on my courses – some are working so quickly on the Crafting Course, it’s great to see their enthusiasm!

I’ve been enjoying many walks in Amsterdam’s green spaces and was honoured to speak to a group at the Vrienden van Vrankendael’s celebration in Huize Frankendael’s coach house recently, about my involvement and hopes for the park. The guests were invited by the Vrienden van Frankendael and I spoke about the River of Herbs gardens. The Friends of Frankendael also featured us in the first article of their special 30 year celebratory magazine. The article is called Het eetbare park – The edible park. I’m very grateful to have been interviewed by them and especially humble to be so welcomed in the park.

Bench in one of the River of Herbs Orchards

Increasing capacity for multifunctional, sustainable urban edible spaces and community gardens is so important. City parks and planners can help enormously with this. I love discussing options for these spaces, with people who can help it to happen on a bigger scale.

Yew – Taxus

Marisa, one of my apprentices, graduated from the full course, in the woods, during one of the Witching Season gatherings. She has worked really hard on the course and I’m sure that good green things will continue to come from it! Marisa runs a fabulous vegan skincare company called Primal Essence and I love her products. Finally, they are available in Amsterdam!

Primal Essence

I’m now enjoying offering walking & talking consultations in Amsterdam and look forward to supporting more clients with personalised herbalism, reflexology and yoga. Details are on the Consultations page.

I thought that you may like to see a few photos from the past month or so.

So what have you been finding? Personally, I’m most pleased with the delights of the Virginia creeper grapes and Chinese Hawthorn, this season. Also the invisible strength building qualities of Michaelmus daisy.

Most people are writing to me about mushrooms this autumn. I must expand my confident-to-forage-and feed-my-family-fungi repertoire! Those shown above are for their beauty alone. I did eat the Jelly ear this evening. The others remain on the woodland floor, logs and benches where they belong – invisibly connecting life and death. Perfect organisms for teaching us about Samhain.

If you can tell me via email where this is, you’ll win a private 45 minute Herbology Walk in Amsterdam oost this autumn or winter! First person wins. Mutually convenient date and time to be arranged with the winner.

Consultations

Walking & Talking or Online Consultations in Amsterdam Oost and Beatrixpark.
Combining a variety of natural therapies to help you to achieve an optimal state of health and well being.

Learning to gather nettle seeds and flowers Green mindfulness

About the therapist
Lynn is British (born 1972) and has lived in Amsterdam since 2004. She began working as a complementary therapist in 2000, teaching Yoga to groups and running a private clinic in her Somerset cottage. Since moving to Amsterdam, Lynn has been helping urban people to connect with nature as a way to enhance their health and well being. She runs popular herbology walks, workshops and courses about ethical herbal foraging, crafting and living in harmony with urban nature. Lynn has a special interest in facilitating mutually beneficial connection between city residents with urban nature. River of Herbs is a local volunteer group which she launched in 2004, to enable city people to learn more about herbs through gardening and foraging. She can be found tending the herbal foraging gardens with that group, some Monday mornings, in Park Frankendael just behind Huize Frankendael.

Lynn holds qualifications in the following:
Herbalism / Kruidengeneeskunde, Netherlands 2020, USA 2012 and UK 2003
Precision Reflexology (working on hands or feet), Association of Reflexologists MAR, UK 2001
Yoga Teacher, British Wheel of Yoga, UK 2002
Holistic massage therapies, India 2004 and ITEC, UK 2003
Social and Therapeutic Horticultural, Coventry University / Thrive, UK 2016

Lynn is fully registered with the Complementary Therapies Association (CMA), Association of Reflexologists (AoR), the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Association of Foragers. These professional bodies provide quality assurance to clients and support to members who uphold rigorous standards. These professional standards include high levels of qualification, Continuing Professional Development, upholding codes of conduct and being suitably insured. Lynn is also a corporate member of the Herb Society and has vast expertise in the field of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND). She holds a Master of Public Health degree, Post Graduate Diploma in SEND and BSc(hons) in Genetics and is a member of the Permaculture Association. As a complementary therapist, Lynn is not allowed to diagnose medical disorders but actively encourages collaboration with each client’s medical team, to help reach their goals more effectively and to ensure safety.

Lungwort in flower – Appreciating spring

What to expect
The aim of Urban Herbology consultations are to set you on a path to address the root causes of imbalances in the body and mind. Lynn takes a Holistic and Functional approach to health. This involves considering how the body and mind functions as a whole, within the situation that you are currently in, rather than simply offering a quick fix to temporarily calm symptoms.

Intake consultations usually happen outside, in urban green spaces and last approximately 1.5 hours. During this time, you will walk and observe nature with Lynn whilst she gathers a detailed personal history from you and then discusses a natural treatment strategy which will address lifestyle factors, exercise needs, possible herbal and nutritional advice and possible physical therapy. Depending upon your personal needs, you may leave the consultation with a yoga-based home exercise plan, a simple home reflex points plan, along with herbal, diet and lifestyle advice. Due to Lynn’s extensive experience with wild local plants and therapeutic horticulture, you may also be directed towards some local “weeds” and nature-based activities, as part of your treatment plan.

Whatever the outcome, you will leave the consultation as an active participant in your path to optimal health and vitality.

If you are currently taking any medications, supplements or herbs, you should bring these along to the consult. If you are receiving treatment for any persistent or serious condition, Lynn will need to know about that, and your conventional medical team will need to be in agreement with your consulting her.

Bee hives in Amsterdam – Hidden gems – Far from the crowd

Who can benefit?
This personalized therapeutic approach is suited to individuals who want to improve their health and vitality. It is most suited to individuals with non-life threatening conditions which are not responding as well as hoped to other approaches. Examples of areas which are most likely to be assisted by this approach:

Stress reduction
Emotional support
Anxiety and depression
Pain reduction
Circulation improvement
Enhancing overall well-being
Tension headaches
Arthritis and rheumatism
Digestion and nutrition issues
Insomnia
Menstrual problems 
Back pain and muscle issues
Immune system support
Skin disorders
Hormone health

Dog rose hips under a hoary frost.
Dog rose hips (Rosa canina) under a hoary frost.

Costs
Intake Walking & Talking consultation: €75 (approximately 1.5 hours)
Follow up Walking & Talking consultations: €50 (approximately 45 minutes)
Follow up online or telephone consultations: €40 (approximately 30 minutes)

Mini online or telephone consultations are available. They last around 10-15 minutes and cost €20. These are only appropriate for minor issues and symptomatic relief/advice e.g. cold and flu. Please note that full (intake or follow up) consultations are default and mini consultations are only offered after explicit discussion.  

Walking & Talking consultations generally take place in Amsterdam Oost (e.g. Oosterpark, Park Frankendael), Beatrixpark or Schellingwoude.

Note: The consultation cost does not include the price of any herbal preparations that are recommended following a consultation. These are charged separately or are purchased independently by the client. 

Prescriptions for herbs – When I am able to fulfill herbal needs, I will send you home with a bag of the appropriate herbs or tinctures. Other-times, these will not be in stock so I will advise on where to find or purchase the herbal supplies locally.

winter jasmine in flower, under snow
Winter jasmine in flower under Amsterdam snow.

To book an appointment for your Urban Herbology consultation, with Lynn Shore, please email urban.herbology.lynn@gmail.com or telephone 06 275 969 30.